Document Type

Conference Paper

Rights

This item is available under a Creative Commons License for non-commercial use only

Disciplines

1.2 COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

Publication Details

Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment.

Lisbon, Portugal — November 08 - 11, 2011

Abstract

Utility-based control (UBC) hasn’t been widely adopted for commercial game AI. Some of the reasons for this are that UBC is perceived to be: (1) resource intensive, (2) difficult to design complex behaviours with, and (3) difficult to scale for use in complex environments. This paper investigates these perceptions to see if UBC is suitable for controlling the behaviour of non-player characters in commercial games. The investigation compares agents using a UBC system against two control systems that are more frequently used in commercial games: finite state machines (FSMs), considered a simple control system, and goal-oriented action planning (GOAP), considered a complex control system. We present a case study which suggests that: (1) UBC is more resource intensive than FSMs and less than GOAP; (2) it was reasonably simple to create complex behaviours with UBC; (3) UBC didn’t scale as well as FSMs or GOAP for use in complex environments.

DOI

10.1145/2071423.2071430

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