Document Type

Conference Paper

Rights

This item is available under a Creative Commons License for non-commercial use only

Publication Details

Bioengineering In Ireland Conference, January 28-29, 2005, Killiney, Co. Dublin

Abstract

Surgical procedures such as osteotomy and hip replacement involve the cutting of bone with the aid of various manual and powered cutting instruments including manual and powered bone saws. Frictional rubbing between the blade of the saw and the bone results in the generation of localised heating of the cut bone and increased cutting forces (Ark et al, 1997). Overheating in localised areas can cause bone necrosis and have an impact on the rate of healing of the bone post operation and overheating also affects the sharpness life of the blade. A review of the literature indicates that work has been complete on temperature in the immediate cutting zone. This study is focusing on the size of the overheated zone relative to the cutting position.